Woody “The Singing Forester” (circa 1960)

Woody “The Singing Forester” (circa 1960)


Music JOE SLATTERY: Hi there, friends and neighbors. This is Joe Slattery speaking for your Missouri Conservation Commission, inviting you to spend the next quarter-hour with Smokey
the Bear’s best friend, Woody, the singing forester, and those stars of Jubilee USA and well-known
song stylists, the Tall Timber Trio. This show is brought to you through the courtesy of
the Forestry Division of your Missouri Conservation Commission, in the interest of forest fire prevention. And now here is the troubadour of Missouri’s woodland,
and the man with words of wisdom, the star of our show, Woody. WOODY: Thank you once again Mr. Slattery, and howdy everybody. CROWD IN STUDIO: Hello, Woody. WOODY: Say, we’ve got a studio full here
in Studio One today, haven’t we? (laughter) We’ve got some fine guests that are going to be with us. Harold and Jimmy here in a little bit from the old banjo
playing, and I don’t know what they’re going to do, but right now D.D. Hallworth and the Sugar Foot Riders. Music WOODY: Hey, all right, used to be “a shave and
a haircut, six bits,” but it’s not anymore. Darn it, where? Let me know and I’ll go there (laughter). Another country heard from in the back. Here is an old Australian bush song. I learned
this when I was down under (laughter). I know this song a long time, old Billy Boy? No, Waltzing Matilda. You know ‑‑ I thought you said something about Billy Boy. Wait until it’s Billy boiled. You’ve got an…
Oh (laughter). Here we go. Waltzing Matilda. Music CROWD IN STUDIO: Hey, yeah, good one boy, I really like that. WOODY: Oh well, we waltzed her around here anyway. Matilda really
got the hard way to go that time. Well, before we bring Harold Morrison and Jimmy Gately ‑‑ I’ve heard of them. You’ve heard of those two fellows haven’t you? ? I’ve been hearing from them back in the background. We’re going to let them shine right out here
in the spotlight in just a moment. But friends, you know, I’ve got to talk to you for just
at least a couple minutes here about woods fire protection. . You know, trees are such an ordinary part of our everyday surroundings that we take
for granted and seldom realize the important roles they play in our lives, or how interesting they can be, except to think
of them as decorative parts of the landscape. But they’re far more than that, believe me. For example, I was reading a recent issue of the Department of
Agriculture Yearbook and it shows over 4,500 uses for wood. And it wasn’t assumed the list was complete. For despite the development of plastic and other lightweight metals, wood has more uses today than ever before. And the demands for wood are increasing. Just another reason why it behooves each and every one of
us to be careful with fire in the woods. For one little spark can destroy thousands of
acres of the protectors of mankind. And you know, by golly, trees are protectors of mankind. In fact, there’s a sign at the entrance of a public
park in Portugal that sums it up very aptly. It reads, “Ye who would pass by and raise your
hand against me, hearken, e’er you harm me. I am the heat of your hearth on the cold winter nights,
the friendly shades greeting you from the summer sun. And my fruits are refreshing drops of quenching
your thirst as you journey by. I am the beam that holds your house, the board of your table, the
bed on which you lie and the timber that builds your boat. I am the handle of your hoe, the door of your homestead, the
wood of your cradle and the shell of your coffin. I am the gift of God and friend of man.” So neighbors, it truly does make sense to be careful
with fire and keep Missouri green and growing. Well now, everybody got kind of quiet there all the sudden. Well, let’s liven the show up, what do you say? CROWD IN STUDIO: Yeah (laughter). Here they come, Mr. Harold Morrison and Mr.
Jimmy Gately, stars of Jubilee USA and I don’t know, I could say other things
about you, but I don’t suppose I should. (MORRISON and GATELY): I don’t think so (laughter). WOODY: Fella’s, it’s real good. What have you
got planned for us here? Ashes of Love? (MORRISON and GATELY): That’s right. WOODY: All right, just take right off. (MORRISON and GATELY): All right. Music CROWD IN STUDIO: Wooh, yeah. WOODY: Man, I’ll tell ya, after all that there
couldn’t be nothing but ashes left. Thank you kindly boys, for dropping by. (MORRISON and GATELY): Thank you, Woody. WOODY: We’ve appreciated having you. Well sir, things have kind of gotten livened up around this old ‑‑ Boy oh boy. WOODY: Jimmy Dean, here today, yes they have. I think it’s about time we maybe kind of simmered down
for a real good number from the trio. I heard you rehearsing this. Are you going to do it as
you rehearsed it or are you going to do it ‑‑ TRIO: Well, a reasonable facsimile. WOODY: A reasonable facsimile? All right. TRIO: As long as the show slows down we can start. WOODY: Let’s see how it goes. Can’t
Stop Loving You, the Tall Timber Trio. Music WOODY: That’s a pretty good song. TRIO: Yes it is. WOODY: I like it real well. Yeah, I like it real well, real pretty there. Can’t Stop
Loving You. You haven’t got time there for another chorus there. TRIO: No, we haven’t. WOODY: I wish you did have. But we haven’t got time much for anything else other than
to say, friends, I hope you’re being careful. And if you’re driving, for goodness sakes, drive careful. And if you’re smoking while you’re driving, by all means,
where are we going to put that cigarette? In the ashtray, of course. Don’t throw it out the window. We’ll see
you next week. Woody saying, so long. Music JOE SLATTERY: For the last quarter-hour you’ve been listening to
Woody, the singing forester, and the Tall Timber Trio. So until next week at the same time, this is Joe
Slattery reminding you to heed the words of Woody and be careful with fire when you’re in or near a Missouri woodlands. Remember, only you and I can prevent woods fires. This program is produced for the Missouri Conservation Commission by Radio Zarg Enterprises.

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